12 Buildings built in the ruins of the past.

  1. A small clump of buildings have grown up like weeds up the marble steps of a theater. The ancient steps wind up to the semicircular top where a few buildings overlook the town below. The stage vanished long ago.
  2. The remaining vaults of a temple serve as the roof of a tavern, golden light shining out onto the street between the bottom halves of tall pillars.
  3. A pier built upon the sunken pillars of an old church, its spire makes a fine watchtower at the end of the planks.
  4. The portico of some long gone courtyard makes up the wall of a garden, pillars standing free of roof serve to lead vines upward.
  5. The exposed tiers of an old cistern have filled up with new life as merchants put up their stands. The tall vaulted ceiling is perfect for hanging tapestries.
  6. Inner chambers of a palace, covered in new soil, has become the hidden vault of a prince. It’s marble decorations and painted frescos now only shine when lanterns pass to add to his hoard.
  7. The foundations of houses upon a hill became perfect garden walls and benches for the garden-loving noble women. Their villas open onto the remains of a dead city.
  8. An ancient prison oubliette appeared holy to those who worshipped the chthonic gods. A descending ladder reaches the inverted altar.
  9. The peasant squats lean up on splendor they could never imagine, a marble facade faded and softened yet taller than all around it. The poor pry some loose to burn in their kilns to make lime.
  10. The curving walls of a church still stand long after the altar is pillaged and the roof torn down. Now it stands tall enough to make a perfect orchard. It’s wide door now a simple wooden gate. The farmer’s house shares a wall with the edifice.
  11. An ancient bridge once crossed the valley. Now the thick, yet porous, supports serve as perfect bolt holes. A stack of shanties climb the sides.
  12. The long tall buildings of a ship yard once served long galleys. Now in times of war their walls are perfect for filled barracks.
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